Report confirms news media still have no clue how to be financially sustainable

15 03 2011

The 2011 State of the News Media released Monday by Pew’s Project for Excellence in Journalism reports what we already know about the news industry: media convergence continues to have a negative affect on newsprint readership while online readership is growing, newsrooms are continuing to shrink while community journalism seems to be growing (yes, I’m talking to you Seattle), news consumption is becoming more mobile (yes, I’m talking to you iPhone) and we still don’t know how the hell we’re going to make money from all of this.

Some other interesting points:

Want more information? You can create your own specific search results thanks to Pew’s handy database.





How our digital society is changing storytelling

9 02 2010

I recently watched “digital_nation” a PBS special on the impact of digital technology on habits, behaviors, way of thinking and humanity. The more I watched, the more I realized: we’re not in Kansas anymore.

Via FRONTLINE's "digital_nation" special page

Much of my generation grew up right in the middle of the surge of the personal computer, Internet and digitization of our reality. And right now, everyone–not just news companies–is trying to understand what this means.

But an interesting aspect to look at is how the nature of storytelling is being molded by the digital age.

As technology further develops, more and more avenues for media are being created, allowing storytelling to be told in a dynamic and new way.

The art of storytelling has surpassed its oratory roots, and encompasses almost any outlet and tool that technology can provide.

There is no medium that has been untouched by humanity’s urge to tell and hear a story. In the same vein as Ray Kinsella played by Kevin Costner heard in the 1989 film, “Field of Dreams,” if you build it, they will come. If a new compelling way to communicate, connect and share information is created, people will utilize that medium.

But perhaps no other medium allows the flexibility and possibility for multimodal storytelling as the Internet so freely permits. One of the most visible effects of this recent phenomenon can be seen in the news industry.

News saturates every conceivable medium: print, radio, television and the Internet. Much of the news is driven by stories.

Whether it be about a community overcoming tragedy like the 1999 Columbine shooting or a country devastated by natural disaster like the recent deadly earthquakes that hit Haiti, it is not just the facts that people crave but it is always in the context of a person, community or society.
Read the rest of this entry »





Journalists and social networking sites woes

30 09 2009
Credit: Duane Hoffman / msnbc.com

Credit: Duane Hoffmann / msnbc.com

The Washington Post has one. The Wall Street Journal does too. So does The New York Times.

Ten years ago, many never would have imagined having to create a staff policy guide on social media etiquette. But here we are.
Read the rest of this entry »





Media convergence under five minutes

24 09 2009

A nicely made flash animation that illustrates what media convergence and how today’s digital technology effects just about everyone.





Journalists in jeopardy: the cost of international reporters

14 08 2009

If a magic genie appeared and granted me any job I desired, I would ask to be an international reporter.

The mix of adventure, excitement and danger with a focus on international issues just sounds so perfect.

Thursday’s morning plenary session at the AAJA 2009 National Convention in Boston addressed the various aspects of international journalism.

Juju Chang, ABC News correspondent, Bob Dietz, Asia program coordinator for the Committee to Protect Journalists and Sandra Nyaira, political editor of the Daily News, Zimbabwe, spoke as panelists in "Journalists in Jeopardy" Thursday morning.

Juju Chang, ABC News correspondent, Bob Dietz, Asia program coordinator for the Committee to Protect Journalists and Sandra Nyaira, political editor of the Daily News, Zimbabwe, spoke as panelists in "Journalists in Jeopardy" Thursday morning.

And with the recent events of journalists Euna Lee and Laura Ling‘s release from North Korea (which they sent a short little video thanking AAJA for their efforts) has led me and others to rethink how reporters are putting their life on the line. They risk themselves for the sake to create compelling news in places where free press is not a guaranteed right. And not only that, the landscape of international reporting is changing.

“The Web opens the door to a new generation of journalists,” Juju Chang, ABC News correspondent said in a panel with two other journalists with experience in international reporting.

Many international reporters today work as mobile journalists – a “one-man band in the finest sense,” she said in the context of ABC’s program.

But this shift from established foreign bureaus to solo backpack journalism is something that is happening more often – especially with the financial state of news organizations.

So international reporters lose a network and safety net of an established bureau. What’s a gain?

“It is a tremendous opportunity to cover stories that won’t normally get covered,” Chang said.

So with the future of international reporting possibly going under reinvention, what should journalists who are seeking to report abroad do? Roxana Saberi, Iranian-American journalist who was arrested in Iran this January and released in May, tells AAJA members five useful tips:

Roxana Saberi speaks with NPR Host Melissa Block at NPR headquarters Wednesday in Washington D.C. This was the first media interview Saberi has given since her release from Iran's Evin prison on May 11. She had been sentenced to prison after an Iranian court convicted her of espionage, but her sentence was suspended after an appeals hearing. Associated Press

Roxana Saberi speaks with NPR Host Melissa Block at NPR headquarters Wednesday in Washington D.C. This was the first media interview Saberi has given since her release from Iran's Evin prison on May 11. She had been sentenced to prison after an Iranian court convicted her of espionage, but her sentence was suspended after an appeals hearing. Associated Press

1. If you want to freelance internationally, pick a country with fewer journalists.

2. Know how to tell stories in multiple mediums

3. Become a part of the language and culture. And familiarize yourself with the legal system of the host country.

4. Balance pressures between the press, host government, your boss and self conscience.

5. Have a go-to person. A friend or family member who can check in everyday to make sure you are safe and out of danger.





Web tools every journalist and web-savvy should know and use

31 07 2009

I’m all about technology that saves time, money and work.

With that being said, here are a few tools that I use daily (and that journos and non alike can use) that makes life easier: Read the rest of this entry »





Can journalists be outsourced?

24 07 2009

Today’s world is all about global collaboration, opening of resources and creating accessibility. You see it almost everywhere in jobs, businesses and the economy.

Pulitzer Prize winner, NY Times columnist and author Thomas L. Friedman writes much about this 21st century phenomenon  in “The World Is Flat.”

Though the book didn’t focus on the news industry, it got me thinking: if Friedman is explaining how virtually all industries are being affected by globalization and new technologies, what about a news company like the very one he works for?

Courtesy of Kewei Shang

Courtesy of Kewei Shang

There’s a likely chance the customer service person you’re speaking with on the phone about your U.S. product is, in fact, not from the U.S. but working in a call center in Bangalore, India.

The several hundred parts used to construct the laptop or computer you are using to read this post can undoubtedly be traced to dozens of different countries (don’t worry, Friedman did the dirty work for me)

Much of today’s technology and past world history contributes to the shift being witnessed in the global economy. Part of  this shift, as illustrated above, is about cutting out unnecessary hindrances and costs.

For example, when was the last time you bought a plane ticket through a travel agent? The internet allows people to cut out the middle man (or woman) and directly purchase tickets through Web sites like Orbitz and Expedia.

Friedman’s book got me thinking: with almost every job sector experiencing the effects of globalization (good and bad of globalization), in/outsourcing and some sort of “flattening” process, what about the news industry? Can journalism be outsourced?
Read the rest of this entry »








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.